CUK 5TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2021

/CUK 5TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2021
Prof Isaac Nyamongo -Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Co-operative Development, Research and Innovation (CDRI)

Welcome to the fifth Annual Conference 2021 of the Co-operative University of Kenya. The conference will be held on 27th and 28th July 2021 amidst the COVID – 19 pandemic. This year’s conference, just line in 2020, will be held virtually. The conference brings together industry leaders, academia, researchers, policymakers, youth, and the co-operative sector practitioners to share knowledge and experiences. It will provide a platform for knowledge exchange and help practitioners and researchers to chart a way forward under unprecedented new “normal” presented by the global COVID-19 pandemic. The theme of the conference is, therefore “Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity, and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals.” The Conference will have three sub-themes, namely: (1) Social and Solidarity Economy and Resilience; (2) Social and Solidarity Economy and inclusivity; and, (3) Social and Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals. In line with the government’s stated “Big Four Agenda” the conference will focus on the role of the Cooperative sector in the delivery of affordable housing, food security; nutrition, manufacturing, and universal health coverage. I call upon you to leverage the conference presentations, network, share experiences

 

Global economic and political instability in the recent past and growing calls for alternative forms of business and models of growth has created renewed interest in Social and Solidarity Economy (SSE) as a viable solution to re-balancing economic, social, and environmental objectives (International Labour Organization, 2020). Social and Solidarity Economy refers to enterprises and organizations, in particular cooperatives, mutual benefit societies, associations, fair trade organizations, foundations, and social enterprises that do not primarily pursue profits but their members’ interests and the fact that they are owned and managed by their stakeholders The relevance of SSE organizations and their value-driven, human-centered approaches in addressing the challenges in the changing world of work being a key focus in major global forums.

This renewed interest has seen the incorporation of SSE policy-making by a growing number of international organizations including the United Nations, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and European Union institutions. The UN in 2013 created the  Inter-Agency Task Force on Social and Solidarity Economy (UNTFSSE) as its main UN hub dedicated to SSE (International Cooperative Alliance, 2020), to raise the visibility of  SSE within the UN system and beyond (ILO 2021)

 

Increased attention to SSE has witnessed the spread of the SSE concept in various countries on all continents, and its rapid institutionalization through legal frameworks, public policies, and dedicated public administrations (ICA, 2020). This is premised on the argument that SSE organizations are well-positioned to become an essential part of the tool kit for achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in general and for better localizing the SDGs in particular, questions on the relevance of SSE, and their contribution to the attainment of SDGs notwithstanding.

Since COVID-19 broke out, social and economic organizations have been greatly affected, distorting their operations and viability. Under these circumstances, there is a need to assess the resilience of cooperative movement and other SSE organizations and their potential to contribute to the realization of SDGs. Do the defining characteristics (- focus on members’ interests; democratic governance; autonomous management; entrepreneurial nature; reinvestments of surpluses) of cooperatives and other SSE organizations enable them to survive systematic shocks and to carry out sustainable development objectives and services of interest to their members and to the society?

The CUK Annual Conference 2021:  Granted the role cooperatives and other SSE organizations play in social-economic development, we seek to hold a conference to deliberate on the resilience of cooperatives and other SSE organizations and their potential in serving as a catalyst for inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals in times of systemic shocks similar to COVID-19. The theme of the conference is, therefore “Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity, and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals.” The Conference will have three sub-themes, namely: (1) Social and Solidarity Economy and Resilience; (2) Social and Solidarity Economy and inclusivity; and, (3) Social and Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Description of sub-themes

The first sub-theme requires participants to interrogate the resilience of Social and Solidarity Economy organizations from different perspectives. Special focus should be on the extent to which defining characteristics of SSE organizations enable them to anticipate, prepare for, respond to and adapt to sudden disruptions compared to an organization operating under other business models; ability SSE organizations to recover from the shock and carry on with their businesses compared to an organization operating on other business models;  measurement/projection of resilience of SSE organizations during times of normalcy; interventions  SSE organization need to put in place to achieve their resilience; and, external intervention needed to ensure the resilience of SSE organization to future shocks.

The second sub-theme focuses primarily on the question of the contribution of the SSE organization’s inclusion of people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized into economic systems. It calls on participants to engage in critical inquiry of the extent to which  SSE organizations are ensuring inclusion and participation of youth, women, people living with disabilities, and marginalized communities as equal players in economic systems. Special attention should be on mechanisms, instruments, processes, and practices in SSE organizations and their implication on inclusivity, level of inclusivity. Participants can also engage in a discussion on practices that work against goals of inclusivity, and the means and approaches necessary to support and enhance inclusivity.

The third Sub-theme focuses on the role of SSE in the achievement of SDGs. The Position Paper by the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Social and Solidarity Economy (TFSSE) and the Challenge of Sustainable Development published in June 2014 underscored the promise of the potential of SSEs in addressing the key issue areas that are central to the challenge of SDGs. These include: Transitioning from Informal Economy to Decent Work; Greening the Economy and Society; Local Economic Development; Sustainable Cities and Human Settlements; Women’s Well-Being and Empowerment; Food Security and Smallholder Empowerment; Universal Health Coverage; and Transformative Finance. The subtheme, therefore, seeks to take stock of how SSE has fared in addressing the foregoing areas and other SDGs. It also explores the challenges that still remain ahead in leveraging the full potential of SSE to achieve SDGs.

Highlights of the sub-themes: Key focus in the sub-themes: as tabulated:

 

Sub-theme 1: Social & Solidarity Economy and Resilience Sub-theme 2:   Social & Solidarity Economy and inclusivity

 

Sub-theme 3: Social &Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals.
·         Ability of SSE organization to anticipate, prepare for, respond to and adapt to sudden disruptions;

·         Ability of SSE organizations to recover from shocks;

·         Evaluation/appraisal/measurement/projection of resilience of SSE organizations;

·         Interventions SSE organizations need to institute to achieve resilience;

·         External intervention needed to achieve resilience of SSE organization to future shocks.

 

 

●        Contribution of SSE organizations to inclusion;

●        Level of inclusivity in SSE organizations;

●        Mechanisms, instruments, processes and practices for inclusivity in SSE organizations;

●        Practices that work against goals of inclusivity in SSE organizations;

●        Means and approaches necessary to support and enhance inclusivity in SSE organizations.

 

●        Role of SSE in the achievement of SDGs.

●        Achievements in addressing issues in Position Paper by United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Social and Solidarity Economy (TFSSE) published in June 2014;

●        Challenges that still remain in leveraging the full potential of SSE to achieve SDGs.

 

 

 Conference Key Dates

  • 1st Call for abstracts                                     30th April 2021
  • Early Bird Registration opens                         15th May 2021
  • 2nd Call for abstracts                                     15th May 2021
  • Last Date for Submission of Abstracts 30th May 2021
  • Last Date for FULL PAPERS Submission 20th June 2021
  • Last date for Registration                                          26th July, 2021
  • Conference                                                 27th – 28th July, 2021

Conference Cost:

  • 3,000 for the presenters of papers
  • Kshs 1,000 per person for other participants and corporates

 

Submit your Abstracts and Papers to: abstract@cuk.ac.ke

Registration – To register follow the link:  https://forms.gle/1mCgJeUnQaQyYXKDA

 

 

Abstract guidelines

The following should be included in the abstract: Title, name, contact, and affiliation of the author(s). Brief background/contextual and conceptual aspects of the study, research problem, objectives, theoretical anchorage/conceptual framework, and methodology. Results – key findings from the research. Conclusions and Recommendations. Other instructions

The abstract should be submitted in English with a maximum of 300 words, in New Times Roman, single spacing with 3-5 keywords in bold at the bottom of the abstract. Authors are encouraged to check spelling & grammar and proofread carefully.

Payment Bank Details

Conference Cost: Kshs. 3,000 (USD.30) for the presenters of papers OR Kshs 1,000 (USD10)per person for other participants and corporates.

Bank: Co-operative Bank of Kenya | Account Name: The Co-operative University of Kenya | Branch: Karen Account No. 01120125033500 | Narration: Research Conference

THE 5TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

ON

SOCIAL AND SOLIDARITY ECONOMY AS CATALYST FOR RESILIENCE, INCLUSIVITY, AND ATTAINMENT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS

HOST: THE CO-OPERATIVE UNIVERSITY OF KENYA, NAIROBI

VENUE: HELD VIRTUALLY, Link will be provided upon registration

DATES: 27th – 28th July 2021

The CUK Annual Conference 2021: Granted the role cooperatives and other SSE organizations play in social-economic development, we seek to hold a conference to deliberate on the resilience of cooperatives and other SSE organizations and their potential in serving as a catalyst for inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals in times of systemic shocks similar to COVID-19

The theme of the conference is, therefore “Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity, and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals.” The Conference will have three sub-themes, namely: (1) Social and Solidarity Economy and Resilience; (2) Social and Solidarity Economy and inclusivity; and, (3) Social and Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals. The focus of sub-themes is as follows :

Social and Solidarity Economy and Resilience

  • The ability of SSE organization to anticipate, prepare for, respond to and adapt to sudden disruptions;
  • Ability SSE organizations to recover from shock;
  • Evaluation/appraisal/measurement/projection of resilience of SSE organizations;
  • Interventions SSE organizations need to institute to achieve resilience;
  • External intervention needed to achieve the resilience of SSE organization to future shocks.

Social and Solidarity Economy and inclusivity

  • Contribution of SSE organizations to inclusion;
  • Level of inclusivity SSE organizations;
  • Mechanisms, instruments, processes, and practices for inclusivity in SSE organizations;
  • Practices that work against goals of inclusivity’
  • Means and approaches necessary to support and enhance inclusivity.

Social and Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals.

  • Role of SSE in the achievement of SDGs;
  • Achievements in addressing issues in Position Paper by United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Social and Solidarity Economy TFSSE published in June 2014;
  • Challenges that still remain in leveraging the full potential of SSE to achieve SDGs.

Description of sub-themes

The first sub-theme requires participants to interrogate the resilience of Social and Solidarity Economy organizations from different perspectives. Special focus should be on the extent to which defining characteristics of SSE organizations enable them to anticipate, prepare for, respond to and adapt to sudden disruptions compared to the organization operating under other business models; ability SSE organizations to recover from the shock and carry on with their businesses compared to an organization operating on other business models; measurement/projection of resilience of SSE organizations during times of normalcy; interventions SSE organization need to put in place to achieve their resilience; and, external intervention needed to ensure the resilience of SSE organization to future shocks.

The second sub-theme focuses primarily on the question of the contribution of SSE organizations’ inclusion of people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized into economic systems. It calls on participants to engage in critical inquiry of the extent to which SSE organizations are ensuring inclusion and participation of youth, women, people living with disabilities, and marginalized communities as equal players in economic systems. Special attention should be on mechanisms, instruments, processes, and practices in SSE organizations and their implication on inclusivity, level of inclusivity. Participants can also engage in a discussion on practices that work against goals of inclusivity, and the means and approaches necessary to support and enhance inclusivity.

The third Sub-theme focuses on the role of SSE in the achievement of SDGs. The Position Paper by the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Social and Solidarity Economy (TFSSE) and the Challenge of Sustainable Development published in June 2014 underscored the promise of the potential of SSEs in addressing the key issue areas that are central to the challenge of SDGs. These include: Transitioning from Informal Economy to Decent Work; Greening the Economy and Society; Local Economic Development; Sustainable Cities and Human Settlements; Women’s Well-Being and Empowerment; Food Security and Smallholder Empowerment; Universal Health Coverage; and Transformative Finance. The subtheme, therefore, seeks to take stock of how SSE has fared in addressing the foregoing areas and other SDGs. It also explores the challenges that still remain ahead in leveraging the full potential of SSE to achieve SDGs

Conference Key Dates  
· 1st Call for abstracts 30th April 2021
·         Early Bird Registration opens 15th May 2021
·         2nd Call for abstracts 15th May 2021
·         Last Date for Submission of Abstracts 30th May 2021
·         Last Date for FULL PAPERS Submission 20th June 2021
· Last date for  Registration 26th July 2021
· Conference 27th – 28th July 2021

 

  • 3,000 for the presenters of papers
  • Kshs 1,000 per person for other participants and corporates

Submit your Abstracts and Papers to: abstract@cuk.ac.ke

Registration – To register follow the link:  https://forms.gle/1mCgJeUnQaQyYXKDA

Abstract guidelines

The following should be included in the abstract: Title, name, contact, and affiliation of the author(s). Brief background/contextual and conceptual aspects of the study, research problem, objectives, theoretical anchorage/conceptual framework, and methodology. Results – key findings from the research. Conclusions and Recommendations. Other instructions

The abstract should be submitted in English with a maximum of 300 words, in New Times Roman, single spacing with 3-5 keywords in bold at the bottom of the abstract. Authors are encouraged to check spelling & grammar and proofread carefully.

 

Bank Details

Bank: Co-operative Bank of Kenya | Account Name: The Co-operative University of Kenya |

Branch: Karen Account No. 01120125033500 | Narration: Research Conference

 

For more information about the conference contact:

 

Chairperson,

Conference organizing committee

The Co-operative University of Kenya

Division of Co-operative Development, Research & Innovation

P.O Box 24814 – 00502 Along Ushirika road, Karen, Nairobi. Kenya.

 

Tel: +254 (0) 721713954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WELCOME NOTE

The Co-operative University of Kenya (CUK) welcomes you to our 5th Annual Conference.  In this year’s conference, our focus is on the role Social and Solidarity Economy (SSE) is playing in catalyzing resilience of businesses and communities. In the fast changing world characterized by shocks that pose serious threats to social, economic and political wellbeing of nations, it is important to interrogate how well SSE organizations are contributing to resilience, inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  It is my sincere hope that in this conference you will find a good forum for intellectual engagement. Further, it is my hope that you will use the opportunity provided by the conference to network and share knowledge and experiences. The technical programme will feature three keynote speakers and more than 30 presentations on topics varying from Social and Solidarity Economy (SSE); SSE and Resilience; SSE and Inclusivity; and SSE and SDGs. The papers will be presented in different parallel sessions during the two-day Virtual conference. We are greatly honoured to host you at this important meeting. Welcome all.

Prof. Kamau Ngamau

Vice Chancellor

 

FOREWORD

This is the Fifth Annual Conference of the Co-operative University of Kenya. The conference brings together industry leaders, researchers, policy makers, youth and key cooperative sector players to share knowledge and experiences. It will provide a platform for knowledge exchange and help practitioners and researchers to chart a way forward. This is in line with the Social Pillars of African Agenda that states “Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals”. I thank the Conference Organizing Committee led by Prof. Wycliffe Oboka for thorough and timely review of the papers and our sponsors who have supported this conference. Thank you all for your support.

Prof. Isaac K. Nyamongo

Deputy Vice Chancellor – Co-operative Development, Research & Innovation

 

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR, ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

On behalf of the Conference Organizing Committee, I express my sincere gratitude to all the participants during the 5th Annual Conference – 2021. The committee remains committed to making this and future conferences fruitful and beneficial not only to participants and the academia but also to practitioners. We commit to generate new knowledge through research and practice and share it appropriately with the industry, key stakeholders and the academia. It is our hope that the knowledge generated will be useful in nation-building by providing practical solutions to challenges facing humanity.

Prof. Wycliffe Oboka

Chair, Conference Organizing Committee -2021

 

PROGRAMME

 

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME –  27th – 28th JULY, 2021

( Overall Conference Coordinators: Prof. W. Oboka & Dr. L. Mutua )

 

DAY 1: 27th JULY, 2021 (TUESDAY)

“Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals”

TIME / DURATION ACTIVITY/EVENT RESPONSIBLE Rapporteur 
07h30-09h00 Registration of delegates Linus / Penrose / Silas  
09h00-10h00 Recognition of delegates  

 

 

Prof. W. Oboka

 

Silas Maiyo

 

Timothy Bisakaya

Opening Remarks

·       Young Scholars Initiative (YSI)

·       Shirika SACCO Limited

·       Global Communities (GC)

Official Opening Ceremony of the Conference

·       Prof. I. Nyamongo – DVC – Cooperative Development, Research & Innovation, CUK

·       Prof. E. Gicheru – DVC – Finance Planning & Administration, CUK

·       Prof. E. Akuno – DVC – Academic Affairs, CUK

·       Prof. K. Ngamau – The Vice Chancellor, CUK

·       Dr. Jeremy Bundi- Chair of Council, CUK

·       Chief Guest- Ambassador Simon Nabukwesi, Principal Secretary – State Department of Education

 

 

 

Prof. I. Nyamongo

10h00–10h45 Keynote Speech: Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals

(Dr. Simel Esim, Programme Manager at the Enterprises Department of the ILO, Lead on Cooperatives and the Social Solidarity Economy)

10h45 – 11h00 HEALTH BREAK/ EXHIBITIONS/ PHOTO SESSION    
11h00 – 11h30 Benefits of worker cooperative model for youth in urban settings throughout the Covid-19 pandemic: Lessons for Resilience Building  (Fidel Wambiya, GC) Prof. Waweru Silas Maiyo
     

 

 

BREAK OUT SESSIONS

Each paper Presentation takes 30 minutes (20 minutes presentation and 10 minutes for Q/A session)

TIME / DURATION SESSION 1:

Social and Solidarity Economy and Resilience

Chair  Prof. K. Waweru

Rapporteur – Dr. C. Katila

SESSION 2:

Social and Solidarity Economy and Inclusivity

Chair – Dr. L. Kiganane

Rapporteur – Dr. M. Gweyi

SESSION 3:

Social and Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals

Chair – Dr. M. Ngala

Rapporteur – S. Mwangi

SESSION 4:

Global Communities & Young Scholars Initiative: Co-operative Working Group ( Inclusion & Post COVID-19 world)

Chair-M. Mbugua

Rapporteur-T. Bisakaya

 

11h30 – 12h00 The Relationship between Opportunity Related Aspects and the Performance of Primary Co-operatives in South Africa:  COVID-19 Considerations

(Dr D. C. Bodley- Nelson Mandela University, SA)

Leveraging Social Capital through youth Groups in Northern Uganda and how Social Capital has Increased Inclusivity and Resilience among young Farmers.

(Naphtal Barasa Etyang – CLUSA)

Revitalizing Civil Society Organizations: An Assessment of their Contribution to Achieving SDGs in Kenya.

(Asige Mmaitsi Lawrence & Omuse Dennis Obushe- Maasai Mara University)

Introduction of YSI & the Global Communities (GC)

(T. Bisakaya (YSI) & T. Sitati (GC)

 

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

“Co-operative Inclusion; Post Covid-19”

(Mr. A. Aganze Zozo – Policy Manager at International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) Africa)

12h00 – 12h30 Analysis of the Impact of Changes in Management Practices on the Growth of Co-operative Unions in Kenya

(Dr. E. Anyika- CUK)

Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Young Women Participation In Tea SACCOS Politics in Nyamira South Sub-County, Nyamira County, Kenya

(Ms. R.  Moraa Onyancha & Dr. C. Wambu- CUK)

Contribution of Social Solidarity Economy to Poverty Eradication, Experience   from Uasin Gishu County, Kenya

 (Dr. W.  Metto – CUK)

Panel Discussion

“Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals.”

Panelist:

Mr. A. Aganze Zozo- ICA, Africa

·   Dr. M. Gweyi- CUK

·   Dr. T. Muzorewa- Midland University, Zimbabwe;

·   Ms. T Sitati- Global Communities-USAID CLEAR Program

Moderators:

·   S. Maiyo – CUK & AFRICOOP

·   M. Mbugua- YSI/CUK

12h30 – 13h00 Cooperative Dependency in Developing Countries: A Systematic Literature Review

(Dr. Scott Bellows, USIU / OCDC)

Democracy in Students Electing their Leaders and its Effect on Students’ Discipline in Public Secondary Schools in Meru County, Kenya

(M. Mutuma M’muyuri, CGM)

Mobile Banking Service Quality, Customer Perceived Value and Customer Retention in the Kenyan Banking Industry

(D. K. Langat, CUK)

“African Cooperatives and the Economics of Restoration”

(A. Ajibola Akanji, The Lead City University, Nigeria)

-15 minutes

“Indexing Shared Struggle: A pattern language for realistic co-op development”

(D. Spitzberg. The Institute of New Economic Thinking, USA)

·       15 minutes

13h00 – 13h30 Influence of Supply Chain Resilience on the Performance of Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Aid Organizations in Kenya.

(E. Kiswili Nyile, JKUAT)

How Mentorship Empowers Youth in Agriculture in Northern Uganda, thus Enhancing Agricultural Recovery Efforts in the Country.

(N. Barasa Etyang, CLUSA)

Cooperative Businesses: A training guide for cooperatives & developers (M. Kipngeno, GC)

 

Youth Conversation

What does the cooperative business model offer to youth?

Discussants

·       ICA Youth Network

·       BOLESWA Youth Cooperative Alliance

·       Cooperative Alliance of Kenya

·       Kenya Society of Professional Co-operators (KSPC)

·       We Effect

Moderators:

·   Mary Mbugua

·   Alfred Ogola

13h30 END OF THE DAY I

 

 

 

 

DAY 2: 28TH JULY, 2021 (WEDNESDAY)

(Overall Conference Coordinators: Prof. W. Oboka & Dr. L. Mutua)

Social and Solidarity Economy as a catalyst for resilience, inclusivity and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals

TIME ACTIVITY / EVENT RESPONSIBLE RAPPORTEUR
08h30 – 09h00 Registration of Delegates Silas/ Linus/ Penrose  
09h00 – 09h45 Inclusivity and Inclusive Economy

(Barnard Chitunga, Senior Officer – Partnerships, Donors and Special Projects Affirmative Finance for Women in Africa, at African Development Bank – AfDB)

Prof. W. Oboka Dr. M. Ngala
09h45 – 10h15 Re-thinking Livelihood Security for Women through Cooperatives

(H.E Dr. Martha Udom Emmanuel – Founder, FEYREP Multi-purpose Co-operative Society-Uyo, Nigeria)

Prof. E. Gicheru Dr. M. Shem
10h15 – 10h30 HEALTH BREAK/ EXHIBITIONS ALL ALL
 

BREAK OUT SESSIONS

 

TIME / DURATION SESSION 6:

Social and Solidarity Economy and Resilience

Chair – Prof.  J. Kihoro

Rapporteur– I. Changamu

SESSION 7: 

Social and Solidarity Economy and inclusivity

Chair – Dr. K. Kirima

Rapporteur – V.  Wambua

SESSION 8:

Social and Solidarity Economy and Sustainable Development Goals

Chair – Dr. S. Mbandu

Rapporteur – E. Musyioki

SESSION 9:

Young Scholars Initiative

Chair-S. Tindi

Rapporteur -T. Bisakaya

10h30 – 11h00 Bouncing Back From Shocks: Cooperative Members In Kenya

(Dr. Scott Bellows,  USIU)

Good Governance and Gender Equity: Training Guide

(F. Nyagah, Global Communities)

 

Stopping the Reggae – New Paradigm Shift in Community Development: The Case of Manica, Mozambique

(Dr. E. Harun Opuka, Mozambique)

·   Opening Remarks – T. Bisakaya (YSI)

 

·   Keynote Address

Topic: “Social and Solidarity Economy(SSE) and inclusivity”

(Dr. D. Mirefu – UNICOOP, COOPCONGO, RECAF )

11h00 – 11h30 Implementation of ICA Principles (1966): Mwalimu Julius Kambarage Nyerere Perspective for Cooperative Development in Tanzania.

(G. Cronery Rwekaza, MoCU)

Influence of Resource Orientation on the Growth of Micro and Small Furniture Manufacturing Enterprises in Kenya.

(G. A. Okello, CUK)

Capital Adequacy Requirements and Capital Efficiency of Deposit-taking SACCOs (DTSs)

(M. Chepkirui, CUK)

11h30 – 12h00 Pastoralist Vulnerability to Climate Change Extremes in West Pokot County

(J. Lolemtum Timu, UON)

The Effect of Financial Empowerment on the Youth Living in the Slums in Kenya: A Case Study of Kware Slums in Rongai – Kajiado County

(K. Mwangi Muriuki, CUK)

Housing Co-operative Member Participation and Housing Affordability in Nairobi County, Kenya (E. M. Onduko, CUK) Panel Discussion

 

Topic: “Resilient Cooperative Business Models”

●    Cooperatives and Climate change

●    Cooperatives ability to Recover against External shocks

●    Opportunities for the youth Coopreneurship

 

Panelists:

●    Dr. Doudou Mirefu (UNICOOP, COOPCONGO, RECAF)

●    Prof. Scott Bellows – USIU

●    Dr. Mercy Mwambi (World Vegetable Council)

●    Youth Cooperative Alliance (BOLESWA)

Moderators:

●    Dr. S. Matindike ( Midland University, Zimbabwe)

●      T. Sitati, GC

12h00 – 12h20 Challenges Facing Agricultural Cooperative Societies in Household Development in Mt. Elgon District in Kenya: Implications for Resilience of Agricultural Cooperatives

(N. Barasa Etyang, CLUSA)

Husishwa: Enhancing Public Participation for Persons with Disabilities

(T. Kamukam Ettyang’, Agency for Dissability and Development in Africa)

Effect of measures instituted by SACCOs in response to Covid-19 on member engagement.

L. Kiganane, CUK

 

12h20 – 13h10 Influence of Entrepreneurial Management on The Growth Of Micro And Small Furniture Manufacturing Enterprises In Kenya

(G. A. Okello,  CUK)

Effect of Information and Communication Technology on Procurement Performance in Energy Sector State Corporations in Kenya.

(Jane Ireri Muriuki, JKUAT)

Sustainable Supply Chain Practices And Competitive Advantage in the Horticultural Industry In Kenya

(M. Mumbi Kariuki; Dr. P. Karanja Ngugi; Dr. D Kiarie Mburu, PhD)

 

Each Paper 15 Minutes

·       Cooperative Legislation in Tanzania: Needs Versus Realities (M. S. Nkuhi & A. P. Mbuya, Moshi Co-operative University (MoCU),)

·   Housing Co-operative Member Participation and Housing Affordability in Nairobi County, Kenya (E. M. Onduko & J. Kaleshu, CUK)

·       “Co-operative Inclusion; Post-Covid-19 World” (L. Karimi, Kenya Union of Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies Ltd- KUSCCO)

·   “Home garden as a strategy in preservation of indigenous knowledge and building integrated societies: Towards sustainable development agenda.”  (M. Emisiko- CUK)

·       Cooperatives and Sustainable Development Goals in the Context of Covid-19, Political Crises and Economic Sanctions: The Case of Zimbabwe. (C. Mwangi, Alumni-CUK)

·       The Contribution of Information and Communication Technology on Savings and Credit Co-Operatives Return on Investments: A Case Study of Digital Sacco Limited, Nairobi County, Kenya. (M. Musabi, Alumni-CUK)

13h10 – 13h30 Official Closing Remarks

(Young Scholars to Join Main Conference for Closing Remarks)

·   S. Maiyo, CUK

·   T. Bisakaya, YSI

·   T. Sitati, GC

   

WAY FORWARD AND CLOSSING OF THE CONFERENCE     –     Prof. Isaac Nyamongo

 

ABSTRACTS

 

Revitalizing Civil Society Organizations: An Assessment of their Contribution to Achieving SDGS in Kenya

Asige, Mmaitsi Lawrence1 and Omuse Dennis Obushe2

1,2Department of Social Studies, School of Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences and Creative Industries, Maasai Mara University, Narok, Kenya e-mail: asige2014@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT: Today, civil society organisations deliver vital services to meet societal needs by empowering communities to participate in debates and decisions pertaining to all spheres of life. The implementation of SDGs calls for sustained effort from both developed and developing state members. Most Governments have recognized that to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, collective action should be fostered through diverse participation of various stakeholders including civil society organizations. This paper sought to assess the contribution of civil society organizations in implementation of SDGs 5, 10, 16 and 17 of agenda 2030. The specific objectives of the study was to examine the contribution of the civil society in mobilizing resources and supporting capacity building for implementation of SDGs in Kenya. The study adopted three rival civil society approaches including Sphere’s, Scottish’s and Lockean’s approaches to advance its mandate. The paper adopted a descriptive research design and purposive sampling technique. The target population of the study was project coordinators from  the NGOs and leaders of the community. The sample of the study was 16 project coordinators and 10 community leaders. The role of civil societies in terms of expertise, knowledge dissemination, amplifying voices of the marginalized and those at the grassroots and engaging at all levels of the process has had mixed results. Successful implementation of SDGs requires the government to consider the contribution of civil societies (NGOs) in terms of resource mobilization and community sensitisation. The results indicated that there is a very significant influence between the contribution of civil societies and implementation of SDGs in Kenya. There is need for collaboration between Governments and CSOs to strengthen their institutional frameworks for enhanced resource mobilization and service delivery in communities.

Keywords: Civil Society, Development, Non-Governmental Organizations, Sustainable     Development Goals, (SDGs)

 

                                                                                                                                               

The Relationship between Opportunity related Aspects and the Performance of primary co-operatives in South Africa:  COVID-19 Considerations

Dr. D.C. Bodley and E.J. Zeelie

Faculty of Business and Economic Sciences, Nelson Mandela University, Email:  davidbodley9@gmail.com

ABSTRACT: South Africa is a country facing diverse social and economic challenges.  A discriminatory past generated a significant imbalance within the economy and urgent solutions are now required to overcomeA what remains probably the single most significant issue facing the country – dangerous and wastefully high levels of unemployment. Globally, a key solution to employment creation has been to make small business the engine-room of the economy.  Consequently, the South African government has identified the establishment of small businesses as a priority, which incorporates the development of the co-operative form of business.  A strong co-operative movement is therefore a critical element of government’s initiative to create work and economic independence for South Africans. There is, however, a history of vulnerability and business failure in the co-operative sector in South Africa. Compounding matters, the economic shock caused by the coronavirus pandemic is of concern for the development and economic contribution of small businesses and co-operatives. For primary co-operatives to prevail as sustainable entities and advance livelihoods for their members, this paper investigates the conscious choices and disciplines these entities would need to adopt to be successful, despite the brutal facts of the environment in which they operate. Firstly, the paper considers the literature to examine whether there is a relationship between opportunity-related industry, market, and entrepreneurial team aspects on the one hand, and the business performance of primary co-operatives on the other.  Furthermore, the paper utilises data and findings of a study completed by the authors. In the study, data was collated from 830 primary co-operatives in the South African economy using two separate methodologies.  Firstly, a structured interview was used to acquire information on the
opportunity-related aspects.  Secondly, business transactions were recorded and basic financial statements were produced for each co-operative, enabling a rating on business performance.  The primary data was then analysed to investigate the strength of relationship between opportunity-related aspects and business performance. The findings extracted from the study’s primary data reinforced certain facts within the body of knowledge as it relates to the relationship between opportunity-related aspects and business performance. However, there are also some interesting new insights that this paper presents, which are of particular interest in times of economic shock – such as the current one triggered by the coronavirus pandemic. These relationships are highlighted, and recommendations are proposed to improve the movements efforts to establish a vibrant and meaningful co-operative sector.

 

                                                                                                                                               

Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Young Women Participation in Tea SACCOs Politics in Nyamira South Sub-County, Nyamira County, Kenya

 

Rachael Moraa Onyancha1, Charles K. Wambu2

1 Egerton University, Egerton, Kenya.

2 The Cooperative University of Kenya, Karen, Nairobi, Kenya. e-mail: ckamau@cuk.ac.ke

 

ABSTRACT: The Constitution of Kenya 2010, offers young women key entry points for engagement in political processes through elective and appointive positions in national, county governments and social organizations under the two thirds gender rule. In Nyamira County, various civil society organizations have been vocal through advocacy and training of young women for political participation.  The principals of cooperative advocate for democracy and one man one vote women in the tea sector face myriad of challenges in vying for leadership position in the tea Sacco’s thus leading to gender inequality in the management and supervisory committees. The study therefore, sought to investigate socio-economic factors affecting the young women participation in tea Sacco’s politics. The study was informed by the radical feminist theory which tries to explain how revolution change can offer the possibility of women liberation. The study also adopted mixed methods research design. The target population was 7392 registered tea growers in Sanganyi tea factory, Nyansiongo tea factory, Nyankoba tea factory, Kebirigo tea factory and · Gianchore tea factory who are members of Nyamira Tea SACCO. Stratified random sampling was used to select 110 participants from all the five tea factories as strata’s. All the factory managers in the five tea factory were included in the study as well as the county cooperative officer. Data was collected using questionnaires and key informant interviews. Quantitative and qualitative data was analyses using descriptive statistics and themes for qualitative data.From the study results 6% of the respondents were of the age bracket 18-35 years while 67% were of age bracket 36-53years and 27% were of the age bracket 54 years and above. The respondents ranked the major hindrance of women participation in tea Sacco politics as: lack of shares in the tea factory; lack of land ownership rights; fear to run against men counterparts; low level of education; gender roles and lack of experience in politics. The study therefore recommends affirmative action, advocacy and training of young women on their democratic rights.

Key words: Socio-Economic Factors; Young Women; Participation; Tea SACCOs Politics

                                                                                                                                               

Implementation of ICA Principles (1966): Mwalimu Julius Kambarage Nyerere Perspective for Cooperative Development in Tanzania.

 

Gratian Cronery Rwekaza1*; Christina M Maeda2*

1*Department of Management, Faculty of Business and Information Sciences (FBIS), Moshi Co-operative University (MoCU), E-mail: gratiancronery@gmail.com

2Department of Management, Faculty of Business and Information Sciences (FBIS), Moshi Co-operative University (MoCU)E-mail:  maedachristina@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT: Cooperatives in Tanzania, have landmarks from Mwalimu Julius Kambarage Nyerere in their foundation and development. This paper articulates the historical perspective on Mwalimu Nyerere contribution in cooperative in national development. The objective of this paper was to analyse the historical perspective on Mwalimu Nyerere contribution in cooperative and national development, to analyse the Mwalimu Nyerere and ICA cooperative principles (1966) and to analyse the cooperative on today’s situation. This paper was based on descriptive design. Information from literature was used in building the inferences. The paper also was based on historical analysis of cooperative evolution. The findings indicates that; Mwalimu Nyerere used cooperative in his effort to gain independence in 1961. Further, Mwalimu Nyerere used cooperative for developing the country in both economic, social and technological advancement. Basing on ICA 1966 cooperative principles, Mwalimu Nyerere developed different strategic options for using cooperative for citizens’ alleviation of social and economic deprivations. Several development indicators became tangible in Mwalimu Nyerere presidency. The study concluded that, cooperative development in Tanzania, is highly shaped by Mwalimu Nyerere visons developed for community emancipation within which the Mwalimu Nyerere times that had an implication on today’s cooperative thinking and practices. The study recommends that; the Tanzania Cooperative Development Commission need to establish a special training program to cooperative bord and management on the adherence to cooperative principles so as to have committed leaders on the cooperative principles and values. Also, cooperative society management to continue making a follow up of cooperative assets to understand the previous and the current status on the assets of cooperative societies.

Keywords: cooperative principle 1966, Mwalimu Nyerere, cooperative development.

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                               

Capital Adequacy Requirements and Capital Efficiency of Deposit-Taking SACCOs (DTSs)

Chepkirui, Monica1; Waweru, Kennedy M.2; Oboka A. Wycliffe3   

1School of Co-operatives and Community Development, The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: mchepkirui@cuk.ac.ke

2School of Business and Economics, The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: kwaweru@cuk.ac.ke

3School of Co-operatives and Community Development, The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: woboka@cuk.ac.ke

 

ABSRACT: In the recent years, more stringent regulations governing Savings and Credit Co-operatives (SACCOs) have been adopted. One such regulation is the setting of capital adequacy requirements which compels deposit-taking SACCOs (DTSs) to maintain a minimum of Ksh. 10 million of members’ deposit as core capital to cushion against losses that might be experienced due to risks resulting from operations. A key objective of this regulation is to enhance resilience of SACCOs to these risks. While regulators pursue resilience, this often comes at a cost to efficiency. We undertook a study to examine the impact of the capital adequacy requirement on the efficiency of SACCO operations. In the study we investigated the relationship between capital adequacy requirements and capital efficiency of DTSs. Adopting a positivism research philosophy, and a correlational research design, we employed regression analysis to determine the relationship between capital adequacy requirements and the capital efficiency of DTSs. We measured level of capital efficiency of each SACCO using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). The study found DTSs capital efficiency to have a negative but not significant relationship with core capital. DTSs meeting the core capital of 10M and above did not enjoy better efficiency compared to those DTSs not meeting the prescribed threshold despite not being significant.  The findings imply that, achieving compliance is negatively affecting the capital efficiency of DTSs. Imposing of strict regulations on DTSs hinders their ability to use inputs in optimal proportions to allocate their scarce resources resulting in lower returns. Furthermore, DTSs having a core capital of 10 Million and above have excess liquidity funds than they should hold. Holding of these idle fund may imply inefficient utilization of resources by the DTSs. We recommend that the regulator re-examine the capital adequacy requirements with the goal of establishing the most optimal levels that guarantee’s safety of member’s deposits and resilience of the SACCOs while optimizing on efficiency.

Keywords: Capital adequacy requirements, Capital efficiency, Deposit-taking SACCOs

                                                                                                                                               

Democracy in students electing their leaders and its effect on students’ discipline in public secondary schools in Meru County, Kenya.

Misheck Mutuma M’muyuri1, Tarsila Kibaara2 and Mwirichia Severina3
1Meru County Government; 2,3Kenya Methodist University
1Corresponding author email: mutumamisheck1964@gmail.com

ABSTRACT: There have been cyclical concerns about the discipline of students in public secondary schools in Kenya. Among many approaches for addressing the indiscipline is embracing democracy, where students are expected to elect their leaders to improve their engagement in running a school. However, the link between this approach and students’ discipline has been unclear considering the rise of unacceptable conduct and behaviour of students, which has led to the destruction of properties and deterioration of morals among students. This study sought to determine the effect of involving students in electing their leaders on students’ discipline in public secondary schools in Meru County. The Bandura’s social learning theory of 1977 was critical in guiding this study. It applied a descriptive survey research design to select ten principals, 196 deputy principals, and 384 student leaders. According to categories, schools were first stratified then, and a systematic sampling technique was applied in each stratum. The deputy principals were purposively selected, while simple random sampling was used in selecting students’ leaders. Questionnaires, interviews, and document analysis were utilized in collecting data. Factor analysis, frequencies, percentages and means were computed with the help of SPSS. Ordinal logistical regression analysis was used to test the research hypothesis, while the thematic technique was used to analyze the qualitative data. Cases of indiscipline were prevalent in most public secondary schools in Meru County. Only 52% of schools allowed students to elect their leaders, while 48% was by appointment. Many schools lacked elaborate electoral processes and the profound orientation of students’ leaders. Students’ involvement in electing their leaders was statistically significant in affecting secondary schools’ discipline. The study recommended the Ministry of Education to liaise with principals of secondary schools in streamlining the electoral processes, developing election policy, and devising holistic involvement mechanisms to ensure free and fair elections of students’ leaders. Principals should educate students on electoral processes and train the elected leaders on effective leadership.

Keywords: Students’ election, the democratization of education, students’ leadership, students’ discipline
                                                                                                                                               

Contribution of Social Solidarity Economy to Poverty Eradication, Experience   from Uasin Gishu County, Kenya

Wilson Kipkemboi Metto

The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: wkipkemboi@cuk.ac.ke

ABSTRACT: Increased in crisis within the economy and the rise in the poverty levels has prompted a global debate on the best model to focus on to eradicate poverty in the societies. Although some scholars have hinted at Social Solidarity Economy (SSE) approach as a solution, there has been scarcity of clear empirical information to support it. The purpose of this study was to contribute to debate by exploring the contribution of SSE to poverty eradication. The study was carried out in Uasin-Gishu County, Kenya with the aid of cross-sectional research design. The target population were all the people who have joined social-economic associations in an effort to improve economic status. The respondents were examined on their views concerning their economic status before joining an association and after. The study was anchored on epistemological SSE theory that prioritizes ethical and value based economy, social profitability instead of purely financial, democratic, and participatory nature of governance that places human beings at the centre of decision-making. The study is relevant because poverty eradication is Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) number one. Three hundred and eighty four people in different forms of social groups were obtained using Cochran formula. Simple random sampling technique was used to select respondents. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through survey method; questionnaire and in-depth interview were used. Quantitative data were analyzed using binary logistic regression while qualitative data were analyzed through content analysis technique whereby it was transcribed, put into sub themes coded and interpreted. The findings of the study indicated that SSE was statistically significant to poverty eradication; p values were all less than 0.05. In addition, the study found that co-operatives form of association were much more statistically significant compared to other forms of associations. This implies that SSE was positively influencing poverty eradication. It was therefore concluded that SSE contributes immensely to poverty eradication on income source, household facilities, housing, school fees, health  and assets. The study recommends to the Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Co-operative Development that people especially those who are economically less privileged should join co-operatives and other forms of economic associations. The study findings shall be useful to all stakeholders in the Ministry of Co-operative Development and Social Services, academicians, policy makers, society, state and the global community at large.

Keywords: Social Solidarity Economy, Poverty Eradication

                                                                                                                                               

The Effect of Financial Empowerment on the Youth Living in the Slums in Kenya: A Case Study of Kware Slums in Rongai, Kajiado County

 

Mwangi Kenneth Muriuki
Chairman, Department of Accounting & Finance, School of Business & Economics, The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: kmwangi@cuk.ac.ke

ABSTRACT: The study focuses on Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) which address eradication of extreme poverty and all its forms and the other goals that directly affect youth in Kenya which include; achieving universal primary education, combating HIV/AIDS and other infections and financial empowerment. Kenya has made great strides towards achieving these especially with the promulgation of the new Constitution in 2010 which devolved power to forty seven (47) county governments. The purpose of the study was to investigate how youth projects aided in poverty reduction and economic freedom strategies. The study adopted descriptive research design. Data was collected through self-administered questionnaires. Statistical tools like Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) and Excel was applied to generate the outputs for both the descriptive and inferential statistics. The research findings suggested that the youth were able to get formal and informal education which inspired most of them to be entrepreneurs and that they also earned income from the activities carried out through income generating projects or Self-help driven projects. Through the financial empowerment, the youth were able to finance for their own education and that of their relatives and neighborhood, adapt family planning practices and created awareness on HIV/AIDs, got involved in income generating activities which promoted to reduction in crimes and use of drug.  The study recommends that the Government, NGOs and self-help groups incorporate and involve the youth from diverse background into economic projects to enhance innovation and creativity in self-economic sustainability.

Key words: Economic, Empowerment, Government, NGO, Projects, Self-help, SDG, Youth

                                                                                                                                               

Challenges Facing Agricultural Cooperative Societies in Household Development in Mt. Elgon District in Kenya: Implications for resilience of Agricultural cooperatives

Naphtal Barasa Etyang1*; Dr. L.S. Mulongo2; and L. Lagat3

1,2,3Department of Development Studies, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya

1*Correspondence e-mail: barasaetty@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT: Agricultural societies are expected to benefit members by accessing cheap agricultural inputs, access to markets, improve farmer knowledge etc. leading to wealth creation and rural sustainability. Cooperatives have however faced challenges to the extent that their survival is not guaranteed. This study sought to establish the role played by cooperative societies in agricultural development, identify challenges hindering their smooth functioning and make proposals to resolve challenges. Qualitative research was adopted and a survey carried out. The study covered six coffee societies functional in Mt. Elgon District Through random sampling 150 farmers were interviewed 25 farmers from each society. Standard questionnaires, interview and observation schedules used. Descriptive statistics such as mean, mode, median, percentages, and frequency tables used to present data. Chi-square and spearman’s rho used to establish relationships. The study established that  societies played a role in supporting  members  access  coffee seedlings, farming equipment, training and extension services, coffee advance payments, market for coffee etc. The study also established that coffee societies faced  challenges such as poor leadership, corruption, misappropriation of funds, some societies lacked finances to operate, poor world coffee prices, tribalism, bad roads and lack of government support. The study recommended that: a)  The coffee  societies should Continue providing  farm inputs, extension services, train cooperative leaders, management and their members, they should recruit more members, Computerize their accounting systems, end tribalism in cooperatives.  b) government should:  Audit and supervise cooperative societies, liberalize marketing of coffee, Encourage value addition, repair roads  and, re – evaluate policies related to cooperative sector. These findings if instituted by SSE will help them achieve resilience.

                                                                                                                                               

Leveraging Social Capital through Youth groups in northern Uganda and how social capital has increased inclusivity and resilience among young farmers.

Naphtal Barasa Etyang*; Jonathan White; Yewoub Gedion; Africano Kasingye; and Allan Dickson Otim 

National Cooperative Business Association (CLUSA) International staff) with funding from MasterCard Foundation

*Correspondence author e-mail: barasaetty@yahoo.com  

ABSTRACT: After two decades of civil conflict in Northern Uganda, Ugandans are now returning to their communities to reestablish their livelihoods.  Most youth don’t have skills   to venture into Agriculture. MasterCard Foundation was interested in finding replicable approaches to getting youth involved in Agriculture. The objectives of this research were to find out benefits of social capital in youth groups, challenges and how these can be addressed.  Qualitative methods were largely used in the study. Research was carried out in four project districts.  In each district, two Focus Group Discussions were held with sampled youth from the Youth Empowerment through Agriculture (YETA) program; each FGD was comprised of five female and five male youth. In addition to FGDs, YETA conducted four Key Informant Interviews, one per district, Findings from these interviews were triangulated with YETA program quarterly reports, monthly regional reports, Youth Monitoring, Evaluation, Learning Leaders reports, partners’ reports, as well as YETA staff’s reflections and experiences. The research identified the following benefits of social capital – improved peer to peer networks, easier access to training and resources, Market accessibility, cheap labor, increased democratic voice, Empowered women and girls. The research realized the following threats – internal conflicts, failure to adhere to group norms and rules, Poor leadership and governance, Loss of interest by some members and positive attrition. Measures taken by the project to address the challenges – strengthening governance, Provision of mentors and enhancing group activities. Taking advantage of social capital is key in bringing about greater inclusivity and resilience in farming.

 

                                                                                                                                               

How mentorship Empowers Youth in Agriculture in northern Uganda, thus enhancing Agricultural recovery efforts in the Country.

Naphtal Barasa Etyang; Jonathan White; Yewoub Gedion; Africano Kasingye; and Allan Dickson Otim

National Cooperative Business Association (CLUSA) International staff, with funding from MasterCard Foundation.

*Correspondence author e-mail: barasaetty@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT: After two decades of civil conflict in Northern Uganda, Ugandans are now returning to their communities to reestablish their livelihoods.  Most youth don’t have skills   to venture into Agriculture. MasterCard Foundation was interested in finding replicable approaches to getting youth involved in Agriculture. This research aimed at finding out the benefits of mentorship to youth participating in agriculture and lessons learnt. Qualitative methods were used in this study. In each district, two Focus Group Discussions (FGD) were held with sampled youth from the Youth Empowerment through Agriculture program; each FGD was comprised of five female and five male youth. In addition to FGDs, YETA conducted four Key Informant Interviews, one per district.  Findings from these interviews were triangulated with YETA program quarterly reports, monthly regional reports, Youth Monitoring, Evaluation Learning (YMEL) Leaders and partners’ reports, as well as YETA staff’s reflections and experiences. The research identified the following benefits: Mentors supported in Mobilizing, organizing and supported registration of Youth Associations with government structures, Launching of group and individual businesses, Helped in resolving youth group conflicts, supported youth access agricultural land, provided technical advice and training to youth, Linked youth to markets, supported youth in mobilizing and accessing funds. Lessons learnt included most of the mentors were men, proper orientation and expectation levelling is key in enabling mentors succeed in their roles, strict guidelines are to guide mentor and mentee relationship. Providing mentorship to youth is important to Government and other Agricultural stakeholders since providing mentorship enhances capacity to recover from shocks

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                               

Effect of Information and Communication Technology on Procurement Performance in Energy Sector State Corporations in Kenya

Jane Ireri Muriuki1,*; Dr. Wario Guyo2; Prof. Romanus Odhiambo3; and Dr. Justus Kinoti4

College of Human Resource and Development, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.

*Corresponding email: jirerimuriuki@gmail.com,

 

ABSTRACT: Nowadays, there is increasing emphasis on ICT utilization in procurement for enhancing transactional activities with the aim of gaining operational efficiency. With the use of ICT, these activities have been simplified and speeded up greatly. ICT has been embraced by various governments to improve the quality of public service, increase access to information by the public and energize more participation in civic affairs. The general objective of this study was to examine the effect of ICT on procurement performance in the energy sector state corporations in Kenya. The study intended to determine the effects of communication technology, application soft-wares, information technology, electronic procurement policy and electronic procurement technical support staff on procurement performance in the energy sector state corporations in Kenya. The study adopted an exploratory approach using descriptive survey design and correlational design. A sample of 211 respondents was selected from a target population of 385. The study generated both qualitative and quantitative data. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis while quantitative data was analysed with the help of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 21. Multiple regression was used to test whether communication technology, application software, information technology, electronic procurement policy and electronic technical support staff have any effect on procurement performance. The study findings indicated that communication technology, application softwares, information technology, electronic procurement policy and electronic procurement technical support staff contribute positively to procurement performance. It was therefore concluded that there is a positive significant relationship between ICT and procurement performance in the energy sector state corporations in Kenya. The findings of the study indicate that ICT is a significant area that organisations should consider in their bid to improve procurement performance.

Keywords: Communication Technology, Application Sofwares, Information Technology, Electronic Procurement Policy, Electronic procurement technical support Staff & Procurement Performance

                                                                                                                                               

Housing Co-operative Member Participation and Housing Affordability in Nairobi County, Kenya

Enock M. Onduko1* Jones Kaleshu 2 and Benson Ndiege3

1,*The Co-operative University of Kenya (CUK), Kenya: Email: emosongo@cuk.ac.ke

2Moshi Co-operative University (MoCU), Tanzania: Email: jkaleshu@gmail.com

3Tanzania Co-operative Development Commission (TCDC), Tanzania: Email: ndiegebenson@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT: Member participation is an active process in which people take initiatives and action that stimulated by their own thinking and deliberation which affect co-operative performance. The study examined the influence of members’ participation in housing co-operative’s activities on the housing affordability in Nairobi county, Kenya, Specific objectives were: to determine the social-economic factors affecting member participation in housing co-operative and to examine the relationship between member participation and housing affordability through housing co-operatives. Data was collected from 35 housing co-operatives societies registered under state department of co-operatives in Nairobi County. The collected data were analyzed with both inferential and descriptive statistics, the descriptive statistics include frequency, simple percentage and mean, while inferential statistics used was multiple regression analysis. Test of hypotheses were analysis through mixed effect model and correlation analysis. The result from the study revealed that, members’ participation in housing co-operative activities is being influenced by their socioeconomic characteristics; also findings showed that there is a significant relationship between members’ participation and housing affordability. As such, in order to enhance and strengthen members’ participation in housing co-operatives it was recommended that the housing co-operative should provide conducive environment to enable member to participate.

Key words: members’ participation, housing affordability, co-operatives.

                                                                                                                                               

Analysis of the Impact of Changes in Management Practices on the Growth of Co-operative Unions in Kenya

Emma Anyika

The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: eanyika@cuk.ac.ke

Transformational Style of Leadership Sparks Great

Economic Growth in the Kenyan SACCO Movement

Transformational Style of Leadership Sparks Great

Economic Growth in the Kenyan SACCO Movement

ABSTRACT: Management of Co-operative Unions in Kenya has experienced several modifications over the years. Currently as per the Co-operative Societies Act Chapter 490 2012 section 27; the duties of the Committee (1) indicates that the Committee of a co-operative society shall be the governing authority of the society and subject to any direction from a general meeting of the society and the by-laws of the society, it shall direct the affairs of the society with powers. The Kenya Subsidiary Legislation, 2004 (2) facilitated the Co-operative Societies rules, which came into effect in Nov 2004. These Rules provided for the election of Board of directors, the supervisory committee and the appointment of managers for Co-operatives. Before 1997 the government was heavily involved in the management of Co-operatives but due to the introduction of the free market economy Cap 490 Co-operative Societies rules was replaced by the 1997 Act which minimized the governments influence and allowed for autonomy in the Co-operative movement free from the government’s involvement in its day to day life. This paper analyses the impact of management practices on co-operative Unions growth since 1997 in Kenya.  In particular it compares this growth in their financial positions, member enrolment and Co-operative Unions registration. The research determines that there has been a general upward trend in the member enrolment and registration of Co-operative unions but not a weighted upward trend in financial growth.

Keywords: Management; Co-operative Unions; Growth

                                                                                                                                               

 

 

 

Stopping the Reggae – New Paradigm Shift in Community Development: The Case of Manica, Mozambique

Dr. Enoch Harun Opuka

Mozambique, e-mail: enochopuka@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT: The paper discusses the integrated development programme by American Friends Service Committee. The paper posits that development practitioners have recognized that in order to reduce the vulnerabilities of communities and people in situations where there is a high probability of those populations suffering from the impact of disasters (natural or man-made) it is necessary to invest in risk reduction interventions in order to increase the capacity of the communities to respond to situations and reduce the likelihood of a negative impact of the event. Programa Integrado de Desenvolvimento de Moçambiqueis an example of a programme that. Since 1976 this programme has continued to see it fit to include in development plans, interventions linked to mitigation and prevention of disasters, including risk reduction practices and food secuity. In order to ensure that the plans have substance it is necessary to guarantee that the personnel working in these areas have the capacity to develop risk reduction (mitigation and prevention) strategies and implement them within their working context. Capacity building of personnel in this area increases the level of cooperation and understanding between organizations and sectors and improve the overall impact of programmes on vulnerable communities of Manica. Capacity building for the reduction of risk of vulnerable communities requires the familiarization of participants with a series of conceptual tools that provide a comprehensive basis for participatory planning. The projects initiated by the community include income generating activities and food security programmes.

 

                                                                                                                                               

Cooperative Dependency in Developing Countries: a Systematic Literature Review

Dr. Stephen Kimotho1 and Dr. Scott Bellows2
1United States International University-Africa

2United States International University-Africa, e-mail: scott@ScottProfessor.com

 

The United States International University-Africa (USIU-Africa) embarked on a systematic literature review to provide a metanalysis of extant research on donor dependency in cooperatives in the developing country context.  The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded the research through the US Overseas Cooperative Development Council (OCDC) who coordinated the study.

ABSTRACT: The research sought to answer the following two research questions: 1. What role, if any, has cooperative dependency played in effective cooperative development? 2. How are implementing organizations, donors, or others contributing to reducing cooperative dependency in developing countries? The research utilized searches using multiple search term criteria to find relevant literature.  The searches included 423 qualitative and quantitative studies in peer reviewed journal articles, formal reports, working papers, and white papers focusing on cooperatives from developing countries on agricultural, trade, housing cooperatives, crafts, transport etc. The study did not include articles from developed countries, credit only cooperatives, and non-English studies. Only studies that could be linked to one or more research questions were examined and ultimately included. Data analysis in the systematic review took the form of a narrative synthesis.  The data extracted for this study included setting, methods, findings, and recommendations. Data synthesis involved the collating, combining and summarizing the findings of individual studies included in the systematic review. NVIVO 11 (a qualitative data analysis software) was used for effective management and analysis of the data. A descriptive coding was done to assign labels to data and to summarize in a word or short phrases the basic themes emerging from the collected data. The coding of the data was guided by the research questions highlighted previously. Basically, the process of qualitative synthesis was guided by Cochrane qualitative evidence synthesis and Miles, Huberman, and Saldaña in order to form a new holistic synthesis and understanding of the area under study. The research found that a lack of targeted studies address donor dependency in cooperatives specifically and instead referenced it anecdotally in other research.  The studies found did point to the following negative donor outcomes: cooperatives founded by way of donor support and incentives performed markedly worse over the medium to long-term, farmers in particular joined cooperatives against their organic desires because they hoped for donor handouts in the future not because they desired to work together with others in a cooperative, and donors assisting cooperatives in finding and marketing produce and products in international markets were less successful than finding markets for the cooperatives within the same country. Successful donor engagements included management training for cooperative leaders, sector strengthening through APEX associations, infrastructure support for the relevant commodity involved, assistance in access to markets at only local and national levels, and the provision of credit or loan guarantees for two-thirds the price of necessary equipment in cooperatives with the cooperative funding one-third itself. The research desires to inform stakeholders including a) governments in their support and regulation of cooperatives, b) development partners including donors, NGOs, and CBOs, c) cooperative leaders and members, and finally d) other researchers about the role that donor support can help or hinder cooperatives in a nation.

Keywords: Developing Countries, Cooperatives, Donors, Dependency, Community
Development
                                                                                                                                               

Bouncing Back from Shocks: Cooperative Members in Kenya

Dr. Scott Bellows1 and Prof. Rosalie Hall2
1United States International University-Africa, e-mail: scott@ScottProfessor.com

2Durham University

ABSTRACT: Global Communities, USAID, and USIU-Africa are engaged in a five-year longitudinal study to examine the role that cooperatives play in resiliency for members and communities.  The research seeks to answer: 1. What extent does cooperative membership help member and community resiliency following external shocks?  2. What personal member, organizational, cultural, and community factors lead to more resilient outcomes for cooperative members following external shocks? The conceptual framework relies on independent, mediating, and dependent variables.  The researchers hypothesized that cooperative member aspirations, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and fatalism at the personal level, perceptions on member organization-based self-esteem, cooperative performance, and cooperative growth at the organization level, perceptions about the culture at the community level will impact levels of resiliency.  The researchers will rate the severity of external shocks numerically to include into the model during the five-year period. The researchers utilized purposive sampling to select agricultural cooperatives in Kenyan counties prone to the following types of external shocks: pre and post-election violence, cattle rustling, drought, and other insecurity.  Then within counties, the areas most prone were selected.  Next, cooperatives within the sub-county locations were randomly sampled. The study utilizes quantitative survey techniques to ascertain the strength, direction, and relationship between variables.  The research presented here represent the first-year results of the study.  Over the longer five-year longitudinal nature of the study will enable a reasonable determination of causality.  The study will also comprise qualitative interview techniques to understand they why behind the quantitative data. First-year results found unsurprisingly, respondents who experienced external shocks in the past twelve months including droughts, floods, mud slides, insecurity, etc. were more likely to hold much lower life aspirations. A strong correlation exists between an external shock experienced in an area and cooperatives aiding members to resiliently overcome the disruption.  Cooperatives assistance to members following external shocks increased community empowerment. Those who are more active in their cooperatives also have higher life aspirations, more personal resilience, and greater self-esteem. When cooperative members feel a greater sense of pride and self-esteem in their cooperative, then they also tend to have higher life aspirations. The research desires to inform stakeholders including a) Government of Kenya at national ministerial level and locally at the county and community level, b) development partners including donors, NGOs, and CBOs, c) cooperative leaders and members, and finally d) other researchers about the role that cooperatives play building resilient communities as well as cooperative antecedents that enhance resiliency in rural communities.

Keywords: Kenya, Cooperatives, Resiliency, Community Development
 

                                                                                                                                               

Pastoralist Vulnerability to Climate Change Extremes in West Pokot County

Lolemtum Joseph Timu1; Prof. Charles Gachene2; and Dr. Ali Aden Ali3

1PhD Student – Institute for Climate Change and adaptation, University of Nairobi, e-mail: lolemtumjoseph@gmail.com

2,3Institute for Climate Change and adaptation, University of Nairobi.

ABSTRACT: Climate change is a global concern that requires urgent policy and strategic interventions to ensure that it does not jeopardize community livelihoods, in terms of food, water, ecosystems. Africa is one of the continents severely affected by impacts of climate change due to inadequate resources including capacity problem. In Kenya ASAL counties like West Pokot are among those counties adversely affected by extreme climatic conditions, given that a larger section of population is pastoralist. Pastoral communities generally depend on the environment and ecosystems for their livelihoods, where livestock could benefit from water, pasture, and salts. Nowadays climate change is said to be modifying the pastoral culture, livelihoods and gender differentiated roles. Increased environmental degradation, deforestation, urbanization and agricultural activities are blamed for exacerbated emissions to the Atmosphere. The objective of this paper was to examine vulnerability of pastoralist community to impacts of climate change in West Pokot County. During the study, respondents were selected through random, purposive and strata sampling methods. Questionnaires were administered to 384 research participants in order to collect data. Other data were collected through interviews and focused group discussion. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS version 25. The study findings indicated that majority of  the study population in West Pokot County are 48%being pastoralist, agro 32% and mixed farming 20%.The result from the study  also indicated  that  climate change has increased, with 54.2% impacting negatively  on community water sources, 49.5% indicated increased impact on pastures, 46.1% of change associated with livestock production, 41.1% is associated with change in crop production, 36.5% associated with change in forest cover and 25.3% associated change in livestock population. West Pokot community are highly exposed to effects of Climate change, with (59.5%), indicated high and low (13.3%) and they are characterized with low adaptive capacity due to low level of education, and poverty. The finding also indicated that livestock body conditions during climate extreme event shows that 71.4% are in deteriorating condition, 26.8% are in fair category and 1.8%in good condition with poor markets due to the impacts associated with climate change that includes livestock diseases, shortage of pasture and water shortage. Frequent drought attributed to climate change is a big threat to community livelihood and water systems.  In order to mitigate livestock disease problem, the study found that 45% of the respondents preferred livestock vaccination, 25% of the respondents appreciated regular dipping/ spraying as effective, while 20% indicated livestock treatment as their remedy and 10% preferred disease surveillance as a strategy. Sustainability of pastoralist in the county can be best achieved through enhancing disease surveillance and frequent mass vaccination and exploring for better alternative livelihoods that are climate resilient.

Keywords: Pastoral community, climate change, resilience, West Pokot.

 

                                                                                                                                               

Influence of Supply Chain Resilience on the Performance of Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Aid Organizations in Kenya.

Erastus Kiswili Nyile1, Dr Ismail Noor Shale2, Dr Anthony Osoro3

1PhD Student, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya, e-mail: nyileras@gmail.com

2Senior Lecturer, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya, e-mail: drshallejkuat@gmail.com

3Lecturer, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of supply chain resilience on the performance of disaster relief and humanitarian aid organizations in Kenya. The study was anchored on the Complex Adaptive Systems Theory and employed survey research design. The study was a census survey of the 330 disaster relief and humanitarian aid organizations carrying out their operations in Kenya. Objectively developed questionnaires were used to collect primary data. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics was used aided by SPSS version 24 to facilitate data analysis. Inferential data analysis was done using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and regression analysis. The data was presented using a combination of statistical and graphical techniques. The study concluded that supply chain resilience had a positive significant linear influence on performance of disaster relief and humanitarian aid organizations in Kenya. The study revealed that for humanitarian aid organizations to overcome the vulnerabilities and disruptions affecting their supply chains there is need to embrace utilization of local resources by raising funds from local businesses, individuals and government. Further the study established that humanitarian organizations use business continuity frameworks to predict shortcomings and develop procedural retaliation and recovery plans to guard important proficiencies against the potentially devastating effects of extended scarcity. To build on supply chain resilience, humanitarian aid organizations should strive to make local capacity building an essential field in emergency response where partnerships bring together knowledge and humanitarian experience in a working relationship that is collaborative, risk sharing and one that involves the affected populations to avert, alleviate and prepare for disasters. The study also recommends the use of outsourcing, spare capacity and use of local suppliers to mitigate against humanitarian supply chain vulnerabilities.

Keywords: Supply Chain Resilience; Humanitarian Supply Chains; Supply Chain Vulnerability, Supply Chain Robustness, Supply Chain Flexibility.

 

                                                                                                                                               

Husishwa: Enhancing Public Participation for Persons with Disabilities.

Thomas Kamukam Ettyang’

Agency for Disability and Development in Africa, e-mail: tomettyang@gmail.com

ABSTRACT: Effective participation can only be realized if citizens have access to information in a timely manner and through accessible formats. For Persons with Disabilities (PWDs), participation is limited by access to information and accessibility of public information. Further, physical participation spaces are not inclusive because of distance or availability of supporting measures such as Sign Language Interpreters or provision of materials in media such as Braille. In response, ADDA implemented a 2-year learning and sharing project in conjunction with Disabled Persons Organizations (DPOs) in Nairobi, Kajiado, Kitui, Nakuru, Makueni and Kwale to study and develop models that would contribute to increased participation of PWDs. The project sought to learn what County Governments and other public institutions can do to enhance participation of PWDs; and, what Persons with Disabilities can do to effectively participate in governance processes. ADDA developed and piloted Husishwa through a Social Design process. The project worked with a cohort of 150 PwDs and 100 County Government officials to develop this tool. Husishwa is a tool that offers a collaborative checklist against which County Governments track their efforts towards inclusion of PWDs; and a digital convergence platform between PwDs and County Governments, for accessing information and participating in County budgets, projects and programs through web based or SMS technology. After implementation, four County Governments undertook to put in place measures that promote participation of PwDs in governance. Further, six County Disability networks were established. It was concluded that Disability Social and Solidarity Economy organizations, can utilize digital technology to break the barriers that exclude PwDs from governance processes. Thus, Social and Solidarity Economy Organization and public institutions should embrace digital technology to democratize access to information and include PwDs in project design, delivery and feedback.

Keywords: Participation; Disability Inclusion; Social and Solidarity Economy; Husishwa

                                                                                                                                               

Mobile Banking Service Quality, Customer Perceived Value and Customer Retention in the Kenyan Banking Industry

Daniel Kipkirui Langat*and Kiprop Kibos 

*The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: dlangat@cuk.ac.ke

ABSTRACT: The novel coronavirus has brought unprecedented global business disruptions and the business operational landscape has shifted drastically in recent months. This is also era which is characterized by high levels of competition and assertive customers who make stay or switch decisions guided by their rational and emotional influences. Moreover, customers are increasingly becoming quality conscious and value driven, hence, customer retention becomes critical for firm survival. To date, there is limited evidence of studies that investigated the effects of mobile banking service quality, customer perceived value and customer retention constructs in a single framework, hence, the study seeks to fill the gap. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of; mobile banking service quality, customer perceived value on customer retention. Specific objectives were to examine the effect of; mobile banking service quality and customer perceived value on customer retention. Additionally, the study sought to examine the mediating effect of customer perceived value on the relationship between mobile banking service quality and customer retention. The study was guided by the ‘leaky bucket theory’ of marketing and the MS-QUAL model. An explanatory research design were adopted, employing Multistage, simple random and systematic sampling techniques in collecting data from a sample size of 400 university staff drawn from two public and two private universities based in Nairobi County who are consumers of mobile banking services, using a self-administered questionnaire. Hierarchical and multiple regression models using Hayes Process macro were used to analyze data obtained and to test the hypotheses. The study found that; mobile banking service quality (β= 0.565, p = 0. 000), perceived customer value (β= 0.363, p = 0.000), significantly affect customer retention. Additionally, the results show that customer perceived value mediates the relationship between mobile banking service quality and customer retention (β =. 193, CI = .127, .266). This study concludes that, customers will remain committed to patronize a bank whose services are considered to be of high quality and with a high value. The study contributes to knowledge by revealing customer perceived value mediates the relationship between mobile banking service quality and customer retention. In order to anticipate, prepare for, respond to and adopt to sudden disruptions, the bank management and policy makers should; develop quality assurance policies and devise value-centered strategies in order to enhance customer retention rates.

Keywords: Mobile Banking Service Quality, Customer Perceived Value, Customer Retention, Kenyan Banking Industry.

                                                                                                                                               

Effect of measures instituted by SACCOs in response to Covid-19 on member engagement.

Isaac K. Nyamongo; Kennedy M. Waweru; Charles K. Wambu; Lucy Kiganane; Wycliffe A. Oboka; Lydia N. Mutua

The Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: kwaweru@cuk.ac.ke

ABSTRACT: Cooperatives hold much potential for generating synergies, collaborations, economic and social processes that enable community development to thrive even under adverse conditions. We investigated measures and/or interventions put in place by SACCOs in the aviation, hospitality and horticultural sector in Kenya to support member engagement, continue rendering services to members and to help them cope with Covid-19. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative data from 545 members of SACCOs from the three sectors were surveyed across 15 SACCOs, and qualitative data from eight focus group discussions with SACCO members, 13 in-depth interviews with SACCO CEOs and 39 key informant interviews with Chairmen of Executive and Supervisory Committees, and County Director of Cooperatives were generated. Results reveal that the unprecedented toll of the Covid-19 on SACCOs has necessitated adoption of digital solutions, which have enabled them to navigate the harsh economic effects due to Covid-19. This has positive effects on efficiencies in terms of cost and time for both the SACCOs and members and acceleration of adoption of technology by members. Loan restructuring/moratoriums or suspension of payment of loan principal for a period while impacting negatively on SACCO revenues had the effect of enabling their members navigate difficult job loses or reduced incomes.  While this is positive, it is likely lead to loan book challenges and possibly capitalization problems for some SACCOs. Policy guidelines are needed to direct cooperatives during unexpected shocks.

                                                                                                                                               

Influence of Entrepreneurial Management on Growth of Micro and Small Furniture Manufacturing Enterprises in Kenya

Grace Adhiambo Okello1; Dr. Patrick Karanja Ngugi2; & Prof. Romanus Odhiambo3

1PhD candidate, Entrepreneurship, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya and Faculty member at Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: gokello@cuk.ac.ke

2,3Faculty member, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

ABSTRACT: Micro and Small Enterprises are an important segment of Kenya’s economy as they account for about 70% of country’s Gross Domestic Product and over 80% of the country’s employment opportunities. MSEs are the main source of employment and their promotion is viewed as a viable approach to development. However, MSEs are ranked highest to risk exposure related to management which exposes them to high collapse rates that culminates to loss of job and hence low economic development to the country. Entrepreneurial management has been fronted as a key determinant for a firm’s growth and profitability. The study sought to establish how entrepreneurial management and its components: strategic orientation, resource orientation, reward philosophy and entrepreneurial culture with entrepreneurial networks as moderator influences growth of MSEs in furniture manufacturing sector. The study was anchored on Contingency Theory, Resource Based View Theory, Herzberg Hygiene Theory, Schumpeter’s Theory of Innovation, Firm Growth Theory and, Network Theory. A mixed method research design comprising of both qualitative and quantitative methods was adopted.  The target population comprised of 10,345 owner managers of furniture manufacturing MSEs in Kenya. A sample of 393 owner/managers was selected using stratified random sampling. Questionnaires were used as data collection tool. Reliability of the instrument was done through a pilot study where a Cronbach alpha co – efficient value of 0.70 and above was obtained for all the variables.  Both descriptive and inferential statistics were employed in analyzing data. The study established that strategic orientation, resource orientation, reward philosophy and entrepreneurial culture positively and significantly influenced growth of micro and small furniture manufacturing enterprises. Network positively and significantly moderated the relationship between entrepreneurial management and growth of MSEs. The study recommended that MSEs be supported by government policies to access to credit, training, research and development to realize growth.

Keywords: Entrepreneurial Management, Entrepreneurial Network, SMEs and Growth

 

                                                                                                                                               

Sustainable Supply Chain Practices and Competitive Advantage in the Horticultural Industry in Kenya

Mary Mumbi Kariuki1; Dr. Patrick Karanja Ngugi2; Dr. David Kiarie Mburu3

1PhD Candidate – Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), Kenya – e-mail: kmumbi2010@gmail.com

2Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), Kenya

3Dedan Kimathi University, Kenya

 

ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to establish the influence of Sustainable Supply Chain Practices on the competitive advantage of horticultural industry in Kenya with specific emphasis on the aspect of Green distribution as value addition to competitive advantage. Green distribution is the process of integrating environmental and social concerns into the inter organisational practices of supply chain management. It entails adopting practices that are not just economically viable but also contribute to environmental and social welfare for future generations. The study also seeks to assess the moderating effect of value addition on the relationship between green distribution and firm competitive advantage in the horticultural industry in Kenya. The study was informed by theory of reasoned action and diffusion innovation theory. The study adopted a descriptive research design while the target population was 236 horticultural firms in Nairobi Kenya. A census was used whereby all the 236 firms included in the study. Questionnaire was used to collect the study data while the data was analysed through mixed analysis where both qualitative and quantitative techniques was used. Inferential analysis was used to establish the relationship between variables. The study found a positive relationship between green distribution and competitive advantage in the horticultural industry in Kenya. The study recommends that the management of the horticultural companies should improve on their green distribution as a way of enhancing sustainable supply chain and ensuring continued cost-saving and meeting customer needs for enhanced competitiveness.

Keywords: Sustainable Supply Chain, Green Distribution, Horticultural Industry, Value Addition, Competitive Advantage.

                                                                                                                                               

Influence of Resource Orientation on the Growth of Micro and Small Furniture Enterprises in Kenya

Grace Adhiambo Okello1; Dr. Patrick Karanja Ngugi2; & Prof. Romanus Odhiambo3

1PhD candidate, Entrepreneurship, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya and Faculty member at Co-operative University of Kenya, e-mail: gokello@cuk.ac.ke

2,3Faculty member, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

ABSTRACT: MSEs contribute about 70% to the country’s GDP and over 80% of the county’s employment. Therefore, promotion of MSEs is viewed as a viable approach to sustainable development because it suits the resources in Africa. However, reports indicate that MSEs are ranked highest to risk exposure related to management. The higher exposure to risk for the MSEs leads to high collapse rate that leads to loss of job hence low economic development to the country. High dependence on old methods of doing business and insufficient/inappropriate utilization of resources was ranked highest among the risks by businesses in Kenya. Resource orientation has been fronted as a key determinant for a firm’s growth and profitability. This study sought to establish how resource orientation influences growth of MSE in furniture manufacturing industry in Kenya. The study was anchored on contingency theory and resource-based view theory. The study adopted mixed method research design and targeted 10,345 owners/managers of Furniture manufacturing MSEs in Nairobi. A sample of 393 owner/managers were selected using stratified random sampling. The study used a questionnaire for data collection purposes. Both qualitative and quantitative data was used. Quantitative data was analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics while content analysis was employed in analyzing the qualitative data. Statistical Package for Social Scientist was adopted in generating the statistics. The results of the study established that resource orientation positively and significantly influences the growth of MSE in furniture manufacturing industry in Kenya. The study recommended establishment of policies by the government that aims at financing SMEs through provision of credits and establishment of cooperative societies, policies to foster capacity building and training and formulation of legal policies that encourage establishment and running of MSEs. This is aimed at enabling the MSEs contribute significantly to the country’s GDP.

Keywords: Resource Orientation, Growth and MSEs

 

 

 

 

 

INDEX

 

Africano Kasingye, 14, 15

Allan Dickson Otim, 14, 15

Asige, Mmaitsi Lawrence, 8

Benson Ndiege, 16

Charles K. Wambu, 9

Charles K. WAMBU, 23

Chepkirui, Monica, 11

Christina M Maeda, 10

Daniel Kipkirui Langat, 22

Dr Anthony Osoro, 21

Dr Ismail Noor Shale, 21

Dr. Ali Aden Ali, 20

Dr. D.C. Bodley, 8

Dr. David Kiarie Mburu, 25

Dr. Enoch Harun Opuka, 17

Dr. Justus Kinoti, 16

Dr. L.S. Mulongo, 14

Dr. Patrick Karanja Ngugi, 24, 25

Dr. Scott Bellows, 18, 19

Dr. Stephen Kimotho, 18

Dr. Wario Guyo, 16

E.J. Zeelie, 8

Emma Anyika, 17

Enock M. Onduko, 16

Erastus Kiswili Nyile, 21

Grace Adhiambo Okello, 24, 25

Gratian Cronery Rwekaza, 10

Isaac K. NYAMONGO, 23

Jane Ireri Muriuki, 16

Jonathan White, 14, 15

Jones Kaleshu, 16

Kennedy M. WAWERU, 23

Kiprop Kibos, 22

  1. Lagat, 14

Lolemtum Joseph Timu, 20

Lucy KIGANANE, 23

Lydia N. MUTUA, 23

Mary Mumbi Kariuki, 25

Misheck, Mutuma M’muyuri, 11

Mwangi Kenneth Muriuki, 13

Mwirichia Severina, 11

Naphtal Barasa Etyang, 14, 15

Oboka A. Wycliffe, 11

Omuse Dennis Obushe, 8

Prof. Charles Gachene, 20

Prof. Romanus Odhiambo, 16, 24, 25

Prof. Rosalie Hall, 19

Rachael Moraa Onyancha, 9

Tarsila Kibaara, 11

Thomas Kamukam Ettyang’, 22

Waweru, Kennedy M, 11

Wilson Kipkemboi Metto, 12

Wycliffe O. OBOKA, 23

Yewoub Gedion, 14, 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Dear Author(s), Presenter(s),

On behalf of The Co-operative University of Kenya Annual Conference Organizing Committee, we congratulate you for writing a great paper, peer-reviewed and accepted for presentation at the CUK 5th Annual Virtual Conference 2021 to be held online on July 27th – 28th, 2021. Only papers presented during the Conference will be eligible for publication in the conference proceedings. By agreeing to provide your presentation material and registering for the conference, your work will be published in the conference proceedings and Book of Abstracts.

Given the virtual format of the conference, your Paper Presentation needs to be PRE-RECORDED (you MUST be HOWEVER PRESENT to participate in the conference for your presentation to be streamed). Depending on your speech, it can be a video of yourself speaking to the audience, or a Voice over Powerpoint. Details on how to record your presentations are listed below.

Speech/presentation length:

Paper presentation: 20 minutes (25 minutes maximum)

It would be greatly appreciated if you could SHARE YOUR PRESENTATION NO LATER THAN TUESDAY, JULY  20TH, 2021, by sending it via the email abstracts@cuk.ac.ke  For any question (s), do not hesitate to contact the Conference Organizing Committee Secretariat via the email: abstracts@cuk.ac.ke  

We highly encourage you to include an audio/video presentation of your work both to allow you the opportunity to explain your work and get more exposure to the audience, as well as making the conference more informative, valuable and engaging for the attendees. Your presentation material will only be made available to conference attendees (i.e. those who have registered for the virtual conference) for a limited period of time, beginning July 20th 2021.

Best Regards,

 

 

Wycliffe Oboka, Ph.D.,

Chairperson, Conference Organizing Committee

 

 

Preparing and Recording Your Virtual Presentation

Format of your 10-slides PPT presentation should include:

  • Introduction/ Background of study in line with conference theme – objectives, theoretical anchorage
  • Study methodology and approaches used
  • Key study findings / results and discussions
  • Conclusions and key recommendations

There are several video conferencing tools available to easily record a presentation.  In this method, you can show your face via webcam (if you’d like) and display your slides as you talk. You can use any meeting software as long as you get a good quality recording and your final file is in the MP4 format. Here are some links to instructions on recording a meeting on common platforms:

You can also use the two-step method covered below:

Audio/Video File requirements:

  • All files must be in MP4 Format
  • Less than or equal to 1mbps bitrate: To check the bit rate, right-click on the file name, click on properties, go to the details tab, and look for total bitrate.
  • Resolution = maximum 720p HD
  • Presentation lengths:
    • Plenary presentations not to exceed 40 mins
    • Oral Technical Paper presentations not to exceed 15 mins
    • Exhibitor presentations not to exceed 5 mins
    • Tutorials should be between 60 and 90 mins
  • Please use the following naming convention: NAME.pptx, NAME.pdf, NAME.mp4, where NAME is your session FULLNAME.

Tips for recording:

  1. Use as quiet an area as possible
  2. Avoid areas that have an echo
    1. Rooms should be fairly small
    2. Sound dampening with carpeting, curtains, furniture is recommended
  1. Hardline internet connection recommended, but if unavailable, a strong Wi-Fi connection
  2. Good headset with a microphone close to mouth BUT away from the direct line of mouth to reduce “pops”.
  3. Do a test recording of a couple of minutes and review the sound and picture quality, MP4 format, and bitrate before recording the entire presentation. Make adjustments if needed.

Uploading Your Virtual Presentation

After you have prepared your MP4 video file, you are required to review and send it via email to abstracts@cuk.ac.ke

Registration Deadline

All presenters and participants are required to register for the conference by Tuesday, July 20, 2021, via the link shared below:

The virtual conference login link will be shared with all presenters and participants after the close of the registration period via the email address provided on the registration form.

 

Simel Esim is Programme Manager (Senior Technical Specialist) at the Enterprises Department of the International Labour Office.

                                             DAY ONE

Simel Esim is Programme Manager (Senior Technical Specialist) at the Enterprises Department of the International Labour Office. In that capacity, she leads the ILO’s work on cooperatives and the social and solidarity economy. Earlier, she was Senior Gender Specialist at the Regional Office for the Arab States, where she led the work on gender equality, the transition from the informal to the formal economy, and decent work for domestic workers.

Before joining the ILO, Ms. Esim worked as an economist at the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), Development Alternatives, Inc. (DAI), and the World Bank. She has written extensively on gender equality, decent work, migration, economic organizing, and the informal economy. Her recent works include a co-edited book, Cooperatives and the World of Work (2019 Routledge).

She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the American University, Washington, D.C, an M.A. in International Economics and Middle East Studies from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and a B.A. in Political Science from Boğaziçi University. Simel speaks Turkish and English and has a working knowledge of Italian and Arabic. She is a beginner in Spanish and French.

 

 

 

 

 

Name: Benard William Chitunga Title: Senior Officer- Partnerships, Donors, and Special Projects Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa; African Development Bank Group ( AfDB) Contact Information : Email: b.chitunga@afdb.org

                                                    DAY TWO

Benard is one of the youngest Career Diplomats at the Africa Development Bank. As a Senior Officer, Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa (AFAWA) a key flagship at the African Development Bank whose mandate is to dent the existing USD 42 Billion access to finance gap for Women Empowered Businesses in Africa, is in charge of leading on the partnerships, donor engagements, special projects, and the corporate relations. Benard is the AFAWA Task Manager on the USD 250 Million Risk share mechanism, USD 100 Million Gender Equality Trust Fund, and USD 61.8 Women Entrepreneurs Finance Initiatives. These are the largest mobilized resources and efforts on the continent in unlocking private sector financing up to USD 5 Billion in five years (2020 to 2026) to women empowered businesses. Benard coordinates and manages the G7 countries, Netherlands and Sweden Secretariat; donors resourcing the Initiatives, and the Inter- Complex Taskforce secretariat implementing the mechanism.
Benard holds a Masters in Global Business and Sustainability from Universita Cattolica Del Sacro in Italy, Postgraduate in Development Strategy and Governance Bradford University, United Kingdom. Benard is a Doctorate Candidate in Business Administration and Masters in Practical Management from UGSM Monarch Business School in Switzerland.
Benard immediate undertaking before joining AfDB was at Olivado Group (the World’s largest producer of extra virgin cold-pressed Avocado oil with its brand across 35 countries in Africa, America, Asia, and Europe ) heading its Africa Business (Olivado Fresh, Olivado EPZ, Olivado Tanzania, Olivado Africa Biogas) as Africa Chief Operating Officer. Apart from offering leadership to the business, Benard was involved in strengthening its supply chain/Out grower scheme, expanding the East Africa business portfolio to have fresh fruit, Biogas plant, and fertilizer manufacturing lines in Kenya and Tanzania. Benard also led Olivado Africa resource mobilization( grants and debt) drive for smallholder farmer program development and for new fresh fruit processing lines.
Benard was the Agribusiness Finance Specialist and among the team that initiated Agribusiness lending for both Chase Bank in Kenya and Barclays Bank of Kenya. In both Banks, he supported agriculture investments in various Value chains, participating in the development of the respective agriculture credit policies and agriculture value proposition for both Banks. Benard started his career as a Program Implementation Officer at the Co-operative University College of Kenya in 2011.

Registration

Conference Cost: Kshs. 3,000 (USD.30) for the presenters of papers OR Kshs 1,000 (USD. 10) per person for other participants and corporates

Registration Deadline – All participants and presenters are required to register for the conference by Monday, July 26, 2021, via the link shared below:

CUK 5TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM

The login link will be shared with all presenters after the close of the registration period via the email address provided on the registration form.

Membership of the Conference Organizing Committee (CoC)

  1. Dr. Wycliffe Oboka – Chairperson
  2. Dr. Lydia Mutua – Secretary
  3. Prof. Kennedy Waweru – Member
  4. Mr. Silas Maiyo – Secretariat
  5. Prof. John Kihoro – Member
  6. Dr. Shem Mbandu – Member
  7. Dr. Lucy Kiganane – Member
  8. Dr. Charles Katila – Member
  9. Dr. Michael Ngala – Member
  10. Dr. Moses Gweyi – Member
  11. Mr. Victor Wambua – Member
  12. Mr. Victor Njogu – Member

 

 

Official Conference Contact Information,

 Dr. Lydia Mutua – Registrar CDRI and Conference Organizing Committee Secretariat

Email: lmutua@cuk.ac.ke

Mr. Silas Maiyo – Secretariat – Conference Organizing Committee

Email: smaiyo@cuk.ac.ke

Submit Abstracts / Papers to Email: abstracts@cuk.ac.ke

 Official University Contacts

P.O Box 24814-00502

Phone number: +254 724 311 606

Email: enquiries@cuk.ac.ke

Social Media Pages:

Facebook: The Co-operative University of Kenya
LinkedIn: The Co-operative University of Kenya
Twitter: @CoopVarsityKe
Instagram: COOP_UNIVERSITY

 

Conference Sponsors

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